Panasonic DLP Lamp (TYLA1000) Replacement How-To

This guide explains how to change the lamp in your Panasonic DLP television matching the part number TYLA1000 or TY-LA1000. This lamp replacement is compatible with at least a few dozen Panasonic models. See the list at the end of this post to see if yours matches.

How do you know when it is time to replace your lamp?

The sure sign that your lamp needs replacement is an indicator like this on your display. (yeah, NSS.)

tyla1000-replacement-message.png

However, you may determine that you need to change it sooner, either if the lamp won't fire up at all (and therefore no message can display), or you find that the picture has dimmed significantly over time.

The best bet is to get a backup lamp BEFORE you need it. Lamps will die. They're supposed to. They have a life expectancy of several thousand hours. This can be 1 to 10 years depending on your television viewing habits and other factors.

What lamp to buy?

There are two options when buying a replacement lamp:

  1. Lamp and Housing
  2. Bare lamp

Replacing the bare lamp requires some pretty involved procedures, possibly including the use of wire cutters and a soldering iron. That's pretty serious stuff, and beyond the scope of this document. But if you feel comfortable with that, go for it. You also run more of a risk to end up with a lamp that is not from an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and may be an inferior product.

The safest bet is to go with the entire lamp and housing kit. It is much easier AND much faster. And it's a 5 minute operation instead of an hour. This will matter if your lamp dies in the second quarter of the Super Bowl. Then what's a quick change worth to you?

You can purchase the full lamp and housing at PartStore.com. I've had really good luck with those guys.

Replacement Instructions

  1. Turn power off and wait until the power lamp stops blinking. This gives the lamp enough time to cool down and the fans to stop.

At this point, the safest thing is to wait at least an hour for the lamp to cool off sufficiently. If you do not wait, you could get a serious burn.

Forced Cooling: Some Panasonic models have a forced cooling feature. After the power button is turned off, during the time when the cooling fan is still in operation (within the first minute), press the VOL+ button on the television and a solid triangle button on the remote at the same time for at least 5 seconds. In this mode, the cooling fan will operate for 10 minutes. the lamp indicator will flash red five times every five seconds.

TYLA1000.png
2. Unplug the set from the wall.

  1. Remove the front cover on the television by placing your fingertips under the cover and pulling up from the television.

  2. Loosen the lamp cover screw and remove the lamp cover.

  3. Loosen the lamp housing screw with a screwdriver. Pull the unit out by the handle. (See picture to the right.)

  4. Carefully insert the new lamp. Use caution to not touch the face of the lamp. Oil and residue from your hands can heat up and shorten the life of the lamp. Press the lamp firmly into place. There are connectors that must seat properly.

  5. Tighten the screw on the lamp.

  6. Replace the cover and tighten cover screw.

  7. Replace the front cover.

  8. Reset the lamp counter by following the instructions here: Reset Panasonic DLP Lamp Counter.

Compatible Models

The lamp and procedure described in this post is compatible with the following Panasonic television models.

PT-43LC14, PT43LCX64. PT44LCX65, PT-44LCX65-K,
PT50LC13, PT-50LC13-K, PT50LC14, PT50LCX63, PT50LCX64, PT52LCX15, PT52LCX15B, PT52LCX35, PT52LCX65, PT-52LCX65-K, PT60LC13, PT60LC14, PT60LCX63, PT60LCX64, PT60LCX64C, PT61LCX35, PT61LCX65, PT-61LCX65-K, TY50LC13C

Posted on Thursday, February 18, 2010 at 08:54:32 AM in DLP TV Repair How-To's and Information
Tags: dlp,  lamp,  panasonic
Scott Jangro

By Scott Jangro

Scott Jangro is a co-founder of Shareist. He's an entrepreneur, an old school affiliate marketer, web developer, a dad, a cyclist, and golfer.

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